Thank You, Crafty Bastards

    We spent Saturday in The Gulch area of Nashville at the Crafty Bastards Arts and Crafts Fair. The weather was perfect, the event was well-organized and the people that came out were super friendly and enthusiastic. We made some new friends and got to see some we had met recently (Hi, Scott!) We also met 2 or 3 people there from Louisville, KY which was cool because it's one of our favorite cities. 

    Usually right after a festival, our website traffic shows a real spike so I'm assuming there might be some new readers, too. If so, welcome and thanks for stopping by. I realized recently I tend to write each post as a continuation from previous posts, assuming you will just read them in order. I know that isn't always the case, so I want to tell any newcomers a few things.  

   Earlier posts cover the process that goes into the heads and also the story of how they came to be. And just funny stories from our life together. If you have questions like "Why does he use road kill?" Or "How are the boxes made?" I encourage you to go back to the beginning. Or feel free to contact David through the site, Facebook or Instagram. He has a super quick response time and is always happy to answer any questions. 

   If we met you at a festival, thanks so much for coming in. We love meeting you and having conversations.  

   Thank you, Nashville Scene/Crafty Bastards for having us and for the FANTASTIC vendors' lunch.  

   To our readers and collectors- thank you for your support! 

Elisabeth and David 

 

 

The Finger- Anniversary Post

   October 19, 2013. David had recently completed a corporate commission in the Cummins Station building in Nashville. To get a jump on our big show in Dallas in April, he'd decided to spend a beautiful fall day making boxes. As he went to set up his tablesaw outside, I had this little nagging voice in the back of my head. Sometimes when you have anxiety issues, you ignore that little voice as just more worry.  Plus, he was pretty determined to get this done so I didn't think anymore about it.

   Late that afternoon, I was lying on the couch reading when the back door opened and he said, "Baby, we need to go to the hospital" but in this very calm voice. I thought we needed to VISIT someone in the hospital so I said, "Why?" And he said, "I messed up". He had a flannel shirt wrapped around his hand and I had no idea how bad it was. 

   We told our kids and jumped in the van. The city about 30 miles away has a much better hospital so I headed there going as fast as I comfortably could. When we got to the ER, I told David to sit down but he wanted to stand. The triage nurse unwrapped his hand and then suddenly, he knew he needed to sit. It was bad. He had run his right middle finger into the blade. They got us back pretty quickly and got him on morphine. I tried to get a picture of it before the doctor walked in and wasn't able to. I still regret that :) 

    The doctor on call said he would need surgery so they got him in pretty quick. They weren't sure what they would find or how extensive it would be. They were able to do the surgery without putting him all the way under, which he wasn't thrilled about. I spent the time making calls and texting, updating our kids and talking to his boss.

   It turned out he had shaved off part of the bone. The surgeon put pins in and sewed everything up the best he could. It looked gruesome and he wasn't sure if the bone would knit back together or not. It was the beginning of a long involved process. 

   We left the hospital about 10pm, after getting there around 4:30pm. David hadn't eaten and had been given large amounts of morphine. We drove around trying to find a pharmacy that was open all night. We finally went to Walgreens, where we found lots of other people who all seemed to have stories about chain saws, tablesaws and other horrible injuries.  There was also some puking in a Kroger parking lot. We still laugh about that part. He says he "threw up like a sorority girl".

    About a week later, David tried to go back to work. He worked construction and thought he could do as much as possible and just baby that hand. After one day, he came home and we knew that he just needed to focus on getting better. He had weekly doctor appointments and it was a slow process. The question was if the bone would actually fuse together and the finger could be spared, or if it would end in amputation. There was bandaging and cleaning and waiting. We were very thankful for that corporate commission because we lived off that for a few months.  

    The doctor started talking about a bone fusion surgery, using cadaver bone. Then he switched to using live bone from David's hip. Then he said it would possibly heal fine on its own. In the end, we decided to give it some time. Three years later, it's a little crooked and super sensitive. The first knuckle bone is completely fused and the finger will never be the same. He had physical therapy at one point and luckily, it's on his non-dominant hand (or as he says, his "dumb" hand). It was a scary and stressful time. But it's now a dramatic story with some really gross photos. Of course there was a head to commemorate the occasion.

 

 

    Thanks for reading- 

 ~~Elisabeth 

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Highs and Lows

   This weekend, while we were driving and setting up for the Webb School Art and Craft Show, I started thinking about the pros and cons of this setup we have. Some parts are so fun and amazing and others are harder than you'd think.

   David has always wanted to be a full time artist and for him to stay home doing what he loves is a dream come true. But doing festivals can be grueling and exhausting. You're either traveling and staying somewhere for the weekend, or you're driving each day to set up. For the Webb show, we chose to drive the hour and a half each way instead of getting a hotel. The drive was pretty easy and it's beautiful in this area. But it meant getting up at 4:30am to make it here. We arrived in the dark and saw the sunrise as we set up. 

     This life also means being self-employed so we have the taxes and the budgeting issues that all self-employed people have. When you're sitting at a show, you're generally aware of your bills that are sitting at home. It always works out, but there's a lot of hustling going on as we grow our business and I work 2 part time jobs. There is also the constant awareness that as we age, this way of life could become more difficult. We're planning to jury for Bonnaroo next year and the thought of being open for sales 11am to 2am for 4 days....that's daunting.  

   None of this is meant to be complaining. I'm so thankful that this is where we are. I love sitting here meeting people, watching them discover David's work. I am aware though that this is a lifestyle with its own issues, good and bad. I don't think I would want to live any other way. Today I am tired and reflective so thanks for reading :) 

   Thank you to the Bell Buckle Chamber of Commerce and the people of Bell Buckle who allow their little town to be taken over for the weekend. And thank you, ALWAYS, to those who support what David does with your kind words and your purchases. I didn't take many photos this weekend and this is my favorite. 

 

~~Elisabeth

Donuts and coffee (and hardcore hair) first thing in the morning

Donuts and coffee (and hardcore hair) first thing in the morning

Exciting News

  This coming weekend, October 15th and 16th, we will be in Bell Buckle, TN ("Close to home, but a world away") for the 40th annual Webb School Art and Craft Festival. Here is the description from the Chamber of Commerce:

"40th Annual Webb School Art and Craft Festival

Where: Historic Bell Buckle, Tennessee
When: Saturday, October 15, 2016 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
Sunday, October 16, 2016 9:00 am to 4:00 pm
Who: Sponsored by the Bell Buckle Chamber of Commerce and The Webb School

Tucked away among the rolling hills of Tennessee lies the historic town of Bell Buckle. The quaint little town celebrates the third weekend in October every year with an event as colorful as the autumn leaves. Eager shoppers bursting with excitement come to explore and find the one of kind items only this premier show offers. The 40th year of this perennial fall favorite will be held the weekend of October 15th and 16th showcasing an array of new and returning artists sure to please and impress."

   We are so excited to be part of this event for the very first time. We've never been there, but it sounds like a fascinating little place. By little, I mean a population of 500 or so. But from what I've read, the town basically BECOMES the festival. And there's food galore and over 500 booths! It sounds like the most charming little town but it has a world-renowned preparatory academy (Webb School). If you're anywhere near Middle Tennessee, please come find us. I'll try to post an update once we know our map location. 

   Also, I apologize for not posting about tools and techniques. My blog app is not loading photos properly and it's very frustrating. So bear with me while I work out some blogging kinks.  

   Other updates- to anyone who has read past blog posts...our dog is better :)  We're gearing up for a big festival in Nashville in November (Crafty Bastards) and hopefully a Christmas sale in Louisville in December. So it's busy around here.  

   We hope to see some of you soon at a show and as always, thanks for reading and for supporting art! 

~~Elisabeth

Friday Night F.A.Q.

   There are some questions that get asked a lot at festivals and I'm going to answer a few tonight.

1) How long do they take to make? 

David's answer is generally "Anywhere from a few hours to a few days depending on how obsessed I get".  

Each brick was made individually and this was definitely at least a few days

Each brick was made individually and this was definitely at least a few days

2) How many have you made?

"Over 4,000. I've been doing it for about 12 years now and no two are alike".

3) I bet you have weird dreams.

"I don't remember my dreams usually. I only sleep about 4 hours a night".

This has been true the whole time we've been married. It's not unusual for David to get up at 4am and start sculpting. And drinking large amounts of coffee.

4) Where does your inspiration come from?

"Bad sci-fi and comic books"

5) To me- I bet he's weird to live with.

Actually, despite the art and the intimidating appearance, David is one of the most down-to-earth people I know. He saves turtles, watches chick flicks with me, cooks and does housework. He's good with kids and helps everyone he can. So, weird maybe. But only in a good way :)

6) Can you make me a _______? 

More than likely, he can. If you can describe it or it exists, he can usually make you a version of it. 

7) Do you do gallery shows?

David has had quite a few gallery shows. Not so much since we really started doing festivals. But he has been part of many group shows and we are always kind of on the lookout for more gallery opportunities.

That's it for tonight. Next post, I'd like to get into a detailed description of tools and techniques.

Thanks for reading!

~~Elisabeth 

You Might Know These Guys

   As much as people love buying artwork that came only from an artist's brain, lots of people also enjoy buying a head of that one favorite singer, actor or character. Here's a selection of the Twentyheads versions of some favorites-

 

Johnny

Johnny

Freddy

Freddy

Lemmy

Lemmy

Joker

Joker

Bowie

Bowie

Jason

Jason

Michael Myers

Michael Myers

Pennywise 

Pennywise 

Leatherface 

Leatherface 

Prince

Prince

As always, thanks for reading!

~~Elisabeth  

Blog News and an Upcoming Event

   I've decided that for the next little while, I will be posting on Mondays and Fridays. I know it's Wednesday and here I am! But...I want to focus on getting the mailchimp newsletter and email subscription figured out and I only have so much time each week, unfortunately.

   Here is the next place we will be (other than David speaking at a middle school tomorrow, which is too awesome for words. Can you imagine this kind of artist being the guest artist at your school???)  

 

This is the description-

2016 Monsters & Merriment Halloween And Horror Art Show

Saturday, September 17th- 10am to 10pm at Fontanel Nashville.


MONSTERS & MERRIMENT SAYS:
 
Join us for a fun autumn day at Fontanel, filled with all things Halloween and Horror! Showcasing amazing hand-made art from local artists, including a very special private vintage Halloween collection on display. That's not all - there will be movies, live storytellers, music, Tarot card readings, world-class food and wines to satisfy every connoisseur! Cool prizes and giveaways too. As Halloween fast approaches, begin getting into the spirit and gathering what you need for a spooked out holiday season... Start your Christmas shopping for all your Halloween and Horror fans! Come out and show your support to your favorite local artists. Tell your friends and family - boys and ghouls, everyone is invited! A portion of the proceeds will be donated to animal charities & rescues (artist's perogative)
FREE ADMISSION!!!
 

 Even though I'm a huge scaredy cat and am TERRIFIED of scarecrows (and I'm sure somehow, scarecrows will be involved) I'm super excited that we get to be at this! If you're in the area, please stop by and say hi. There's a long list of artists and really cool events scheduled. Check them out on Facebook or Event Brite or any of the other places it shows up because I'm seeing A LOT of mentions out there!
 
The Fontanel description from Facebook: 
 

The Mansion at Fontanel is a 33,000 square foot log cabin and former home of Country Music legend and Hall of Fame member Barbara Mandrell is open for daily tours. This is the only “home of the star” tour in Nashville that you can actually go inside! The Mansion boasts over 20 rooms, 13 bathrooms, 5 fireplaces, 2 kitchens, an indoor pool and even an indoor shooting range.

Sounds like a fun day and evening and we hope to see some of you there. 

Thanks for reading- 

~~Elisabeth

 

 

The Flea Off Market-Louisville, KY


Blogging from the road for the first time. Long post warning!

It's 9:40 am (10:40 up here in Louisville time) and the festival officially opens in 20 minutes, but there are people milling around. We left home at 4 am and started the 3 1/2 hour drive. After about an hour of interstate and nauseating hilly highway driving, we turned onto highway 101 North. This is one of the most beautiful drives I've ever experienced. Rolling hills covered in lush deep green grass, low lying areas blanketed in fog and beautiful farms are on both sides of the highway. There are fields full of cows and horses. One scrubby field had a cream and gray spotted miniature horse standing beside a bale of hay. I could have spent an hour walking along taking pictures (obviously....I took none so just trust me here. Or, go for a gorgeous summer drive).  Edited: I took some on the drive back.

 

Taken on the way back, somewhere in Kentucky 

Taken on the way back, somewhere in Kentucky 

The photos will never capture the cool air and fresh sweet scent of cut hay and the glimpses of little houses down in valleys      

The photos will never capture the cool air and fresh sweet scent of cut hay and the glimpses of little houses down in valleys

 

 

 

Apparently we left earlier last time (July 4th weekend) because we didn't get here to set up today until 9am, after most people were almost set up. Pulling in to set up when other booths are already up makes it more challenging, but we had very nice neighbors who understood when our booth stuff was spread all over the place. The weather is absolutely PERFECT and it's about time to wander and take some photos. 

 

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3pm. The weather is unbelievable. And the people we've met here are some of the friendliest anywhere.. We're in the NuLu district, also known as East Market District. According to nulu.org:

"NuLu is best known for its art galleries, specialty stores, antique shops and a growing number of local, upscale restaurants.

The term 'NuLu' is a portmanteau meaning 'New Louisville'. As home to the greenest commercial building in Kentucky, many historic restoration projects, as well as several restaurants offering organic and locally sourced ingredients, NuLu has emerged with a culture of sustainability."

  What I've noticed is natural beauty in the middle of a city, but in a way that incorporates the best of both. And an interesting mix of architecture.  When you get off the interstate to come down to the NuLu area, the area feels like a mix of an historical area, a neighborhood and a business district.

I love to see how areas mark their territory 

I love to see how areas mark their territory 

Lincoln Elementary Performing Arts School

Lincoln Elementary Performing Arts School

Directly across the road from where our booth is, we can see the entrance to the Home for the Innocents.  This is  "  a private, non-profit agency that has been in operation for 135 years, served   over 7,000 children and their families last year.   The Home provides services to assist those who are facing severe crisis". They care for abandoned, neglected and abused children, provide a home-like hospital environment for medically-fragile children and also offer services to children with autism  and behavioral issues. 

Directly across the road from where our booth is, we can see the entrance to the Home for the Innocents.  This is  " a private, non-profit agency that has been in operation for 135 years, served over 7,000 children and their families last year. The Home provides services to assist those who are facing severe crisis". They care for abandoned, neglected and abused children, provide a home-like hospital environment for medically-fragile children and also offer services to children with autism  and behavioral issues. 

10:20 am, Sunday. Sitting in the booth on this glorious sunny morning, drinking my hotel coffee. We stay at the Airport Springhill Suites and it is incredible. Probably the best affordable hotel we've ever stayed at. Highly recommend.   Last night for dinner, we followed the recommendation of some locals and went to Against the Grain. From their website-

"Against The Grain Brewery & Smokehouse is located in the southeast corner of Louisville Slugger Field at the corner of Jackson and Main Street. It is a former train station that features beautifully ornate industrial architecture, lending to the beauty of the dining room and brewhouse. Inside you will find one of the nations only operational, Victorian styled and 3 story 'showpiece' brewhouses. The copper clad 15 barrel brewhouse is complimented by eclectic pieces of art produced by Louisvillian artists."

David had the brisket and I had a "fun guy" mushroom burger. It was truly a memorable meal out and I finally tasted a beer I liked (Black Hearted Imp if you're looking for a dark beer with a really clean light flavor). And I don't even like or drink beer. David got Stranger Things after he realized he didn't like the dark beer. He said it was grapefruit-y and he would recommend it :)

 

Black -Hearted Imp

Black -Hearted Imp



After dinner, we went to the riverfront and walked. Louisville is full of fascinating history and the waterfront area is a large part of it. It's nice to just be out together on a date in a city we loved instantly. There are so many bikes, families, dogs, interesting architecture and fun events. It quickly became a new favorite place to visit. Residents are very proud of their city. You regularly see people with Louisville and Cardinals shirts and LOTS of Fleur-de-lis (which is the seal of Louisville) shirts and tattoos. 

 I love places that put in the extra effort to make the streets beautiful.

 I love places that put in the extra effort to make the streets beautiful.

This is the foot of the statue of Pee Wee Reese. I took a picture of the whole statue, but this is more entertaining and true to what our time together is like. 

This is the foot of the statue of Pee Wee Reese. I took a picture of the whole statue, but this is more entertaining and true to what our time together is like. 

Louisville take its baseball seriously.

Louisville take its baseball seriously.

Walking along the waterfront

Walking along the waterfront

Walking in the steps of great minds (minus Andrew Jackson :)

Walking in the steps of great minds (minus Andrew Jackson :)

    As I'm writing this, it is now Monday afternoon and my computer AND phone have been giving me all kinds of issues with this post. We had a great Sunday at the Flea Off and if you're ever in the area you should check it out. It is a really good mix of music, food, drinks and vendors selling all kinds of fun things. Terrariums, vintage clothing, aromatherapy jewelry, regular jewelry, records and even shrunken heads ;)  There is a cocktail/beer vendor that sells Kentucky Mules, Bloody Marys, "Flea Tea" which is iced tea with vodka in it and other drinks. And of course, there are food trucks! There is also one thing (below)  that I've never seen at any of the festivals we have done- seating!

 I don't know if you can really make it out in this photo. But they have set up all these shaded sitting areas with comfy chairs and plants. Up there near the donut truck, there is a dj playing music and a dance platform where people perform. The organizers work really hard to make this a place for people to congregate and have fun. 

 I don't know if you can really make it out in this photo. But they have set up all these shaded sitting areas with comfy chairs and plants. Up there near the donut truck, there is a dj playing music and a dance platform where people perform. The organizers work really hard to make this a place for people to congregate and have fun. 

I don't know what "chicken shit bingo" is. But it sounds fun, doesn't it?

I don't know what "chicken shit bingo" is. But it sounds fun, doesn't it?

I think taking donations like this is a great idea and I saw lots of people giving money. This event is every month and seems to be really popular with the locals. I am so glad we got to be a part of it. 

I think taking donations like this is a great idea and I saw lots of people giving money. This event is every month and seems to be really popular with the locals. I am so glad we got to be a part of it. 

 We went to Louisville for the first time back over July 4th weekend and loved it instantly. It feels like a place that holds onto the past in a way of honoring what was important, but also moves forward and embraces new ideas. It has a funky 90s vibe while also being a very environmentally friendly city. We wanted to see as much as possible. On that visit, my brother told me, "Do not leave Louisville without visiting Cave Hill Cemetery". So we made sure we made the time and it was so worth it.  This is where Muhammad Ali was buried. We never saw his gravesite, but we did see a tent with a guard standing nearby back in a corner and I am pretty sure that was it. Colonel Sanders was also buried here. We had a nice rainy early morning drive through this beautiful peaceful place. 

Cave Hill is a 296 acre Victorian era cemetery and arboretum.  James Irvin was a steamboat captain and was on the board of Cave Hill Cemetery. 

Cave Hill is a 296 acre Victorian era cemetery and arboretum.  James Irvin was a steamboat captain and was on the board of Cave Hill Cemetery. 

Lots of geese and beautiful old trees

Lots of geese and beautiful old trees

Cave Hill National Cemetery is about 4.1 acres within the almost 300 acres of Cave Hill Cemetery.  It is  extremely moving to see row after row of Civil War graves.  

Cave Hill National Cemetery is about 4.1 acres within the almost 300 acres of Cave Hill Cemetery.  It is  extremely moving to see row after row of Civil War graves.  

   So back to this glorious Labor Day weekend. As always, we met some really wonderful people. And dogs.

This dude rode in style with his own stroller and a tupperware container of water.

This dude rode in style with his own stroller and a tupperware container of water.

Dino (the bigger one) made a slightly reluctant friend

Dino (the bigger one) made a slightly reluctant friend

David got some work done and people that came in got to see how a piece is made. Kids always love this. 

David got some work done and people that came in got to see how a piece is made. Kids always love this. 

After two very full days, it was time to pack back up and head home. 

Giant box of boxes- easier to pull on a dolley

Giant box of boxes- easier to pull on a dolley

A huge thanks to the Flea Off Market organizers,  vendors and visitors for making this event what it is. And thanks to the city of Louisville for being such a fantastic place. Your city and the people in it are truly awesome and we will be back.

We aren't selfie professionals.

We aren't selfie professionals.

But we make it work. 

But we make it work. 

Thanks for reading!

~~Elisabeth and David

Sacrifices of a Trypophobic Wife

   There's something about me that can sometimes be very helpful to David. I have trypophobia, which is defined as an "intense, irrational fear of irregular patterns or clusters of small holes or bumps". If you're curious about having it or not, there are online tests you can put yourself through. This test made me literally physically ill. So.....below is a collection of heads that have made me very uncomfortable. On many occasion, David will bring a head to me and if I recoil in horror, he walks away satisfied. If I say, "Oh, he's cute", he'll say, "Off to do more work". He calls me his "Gross-O-Meter". Of course, this is all in fun and although it does make me feel slightly nauseous, it's a sacrifice I'm happy to make :) Enjoy.

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I don't know if those disturb anyone else or not. At one point, we had one head that I felt like giving away just so I wouldn't see it any more :) But, even when they're creepy, they're still (usually) pretty cute.

Thanks for reading-- 

~~ Elisabeth

I'll be back Monday with a post from the road- headed to Louisville for the Flea Off this weekend! 

Heart in My Head Again-2011

We have a small private collection of heads on our wall. These are pieces that we just can't let go of and of all those, there is one that's my absolute favorite. I thought it would be fun to show this piece as a series of small sections first.

 

Watch gears

Watch gears

David was given some watch crystals and that made him start thinking about what else he could use from a watch and also the narrative around watches, time, the passing of time, etc... And then he bought a bag of assorted watch parts on Ebay.

 

I love the way the gears frame his eyes

I love the way the gears frame his eyes

There is something about this piece that just speaks to me. I love the tiny gears and the way the metal looks against the clay.

 

The picture was from a Smithsonian Magazine article about the Depression Era. 

The picture was from a Smithsonian Magazine article about the Depression Era. 

I think this piece would appeal to anyone who likes Steampunk. I asked David if that was part of his inspiration and he said no, but Steampunk being popular increased the availability of watch gears on Ebay.

 

Watch hands

Watch hands

I love the symmetry and vertical lines of this section. 

 

Plug from the vacuum tube in a guitar amp

Plug from the vacuum tube in a guitar amp

When you combine it all--

 

On the sides of his head are parts from the shutter mechanism on a 1960s camera

On the sides of his head are parts from the shutter mechanism on a 1960s camera

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Storytime--College, Animation and the First Polymer Man- Part 1

  This is a story with no pictures, mainly because it was so long ago. If you choose to not read, that's fine too.

    Back in 2000, we had a 6 year old and a 3 year old and were living in an apartment. We had big dreams, but they were somewhat vague and involved art and traveling. At one point, in an effort to gain focus and stop distracting ourselves, we gave up TV. These were the quiet days before cell phones so we had time in our heads to ponder. It became clear that what we really needed to do was pursue the original dream we had- art school. An animation program, to be specific.

    So...being the research-oriented person I am, I started looking up animation programs. Yes, we had Internet (and indoor plumbing!) I gather and condense information as a way of life so I basically had this list of schools. One of them had won the Chuck Jones Award for Excellence (or something similar) and seemed good. State school so tuition was decent. Great program. Good size with smaller classes. But...it was 600 miles away in Pennsylvania.     

   David was really excited by that one so we sent away for info and mentioned it to a few people. The first response we got was, "You're kidding! I know someone who lives there. And she's an artist!" Someone that lives in a town of 7000 people 600 miles away. Seemed like a sign.  

    We got the info and made the decision to move there. It was crazy, but it was right. David applied, got accepted and we started telling people. Then we started the moving process.

    We made contact with the artist we were introduced to (she and her husband said we could stay with them for the weekend) and my dad rented us a van for the drive up. We went up in April, knowing we were moving there but knowing nothing about what THERE even was. Looking back...yes, it was crazy. But it was adventure!

Next up- Part 2- The Trip